Copenhagen Pride Parade 2012

LGBT Copenhagen

Love of freedom. Freedom to love. That was the slogan during World Outgames in Copenhagen back in 2009, and it has never rung truer in Copenhagen than today. Copenhageners are open-minded, relaxed and tolerant people, and the capital city has long been a playground for both gay Danes and tourists. Here you can be free, open and most of all yourself.

Today, a lot of western countries are tolerant towards gays, but Denmark has always been in the lead when it has come down to passing laws to secure equality for gay men and lesbians.

Nyhavn in rainbow colours, photo SAS

Copenhagen is a beautiful and laid-back city, and attitudes towards gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgendered persons are liberal and open-minded. Members of the LGBT community tend to mix more freely here than in so many other large cities around the world.

All the LGBT bars and clubs in Copenhagen are within walking distance, and you will find a concentration of bars in Studiestræde street and around City Hall Square.. See our guide to LGBT bars, events, venues & restaurants.

Church of Our Lady, photo Copenhagen Media Center

Most gay-friendly place on the planet

In 2014, Copenhagen was proclaimed the no. 1 most gay-friendly place on the planet by Lonely Planet, the largest travel guide book publisher in the world.

Earlier the same year, Copenhagen won the OUT Traveler "Where to Go Next/Breakout Destination" award.

Openly gay

Denmark is a very small country with only 5.6 million inhabitants, and attitudes towards public persons, royalty and celebrities are very relaxed. Many politicians, stand-up comedians, DJ’s and artists are openly gay, and more often than not, they are praised for being role-models for young members of the LGBT community.

Copenhagen Pride, photo Anders Jung

One of them is a 15 year-old lesbian winner of the Danish X-Factor on national television, and the examples are many of course. From sports stars to musicians to politicians and celebrities from all other kinds of public stages. Lately lesbians in particular have received much more positive attention and have grown out of the stereotypical picture in which they so often have been portrayed.

In many cases, being gay, bisexual or lesbian is not even worth mentioning, just like you would not make a big deal out of being heterosexual. Intolerance, homophobia and hate crimes regrettably do occur, but they are frowned upon by the general public, and the Danish police takes reports of hate crimes seriously and will persecute offenders.

The open-minded, laidback Danes

Danes in general are rather humble, moderate and reserved in their expressions. They do rarely make a fuss about themselves in public. You will thus not find many rainbow-coloured flags swaying in the streets. Copenhageners are much more subtle than that.

Copenhagen Pride, photo Connie Maria Westergaard

However, once a year, during the month of August, Copenhageners tend to forget their own moderate nature and show their pride during Copenhagen Pride. The pride parade moves through Copenhagen city centre and ends at City Hall Square, renamed Pride Square on the occasion.

Another major LGBT event is MIX Copenhagen LGBT film festival, which takes place every October.

Official support

The official Denmark is in great support of LGBT and human rights. Denmark was the first country in the world to legalise same-sex registered partnerships and celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2014. Danish politicians have continued to pass laws to ensure the rights of the LGBT community, and today, gay couples can also marry and adopt children.

In 2014, the Danish parliament passed a landmark law allowing transgender people to obtain official documents reflecting their gender identity without needing to be diagnosed with a mental disorder or undergo surgeries resulting in irreversible sterilisation.

Besides, in 2014 Copenhagen named a central square Rainbow Square in the name of the LGBT community. 

Welcome to Copenhagen, where being yourself is not a crime.

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LGBT Copenhagen

Guide to LGBT Copenhagen

Copenhageners are open-minded, relaxed and tolerant people, and the capital city has long been a playground for both local and visiting LGBT persons. Here you can be free, open and most of all yourself.

Outgames 2009 in Copenhagen

Guide to LGBT bars, events, venues & restaurants

See our list of Copenhagen's LGBT bars, events and restaurants.

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Film: Explore LGBT Copenhagen

Copenhageners are open-minded, relaxed and tolerant people. In Denmark's capital city you can be free, open and most of all yourself. Watch the film to see, what Copenhagen has to offer you as an LGBT traveller.

Download Copenhagen Gay Guide 2017/18

Or pick up a copy inside Copenhagen Visitor Centre, Vesterbrogade 4A. Please ask at the front desk for the guide.

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LGBT facts

The National Association for Gays and Lesbians (LGBT Denmark) was founded by Axel Axgil in 1948 as the first of its kind in the world.

In 1989, Denmark was the first country in the world to recognise registered partnerships for same-sex couples. Thus Danes Eigil and Axel Axgil were the first couple in the world to enter into a registered same-sex partnership, after 40 years of being engaged.

In 2009, Copenhagen hosted World Outgames, and it became possible for registered gay couples to adopt children.

In 2012, it became possible for gay people to be married in church.

In 2014, Copenhagen City Council named a central square next to City Hall Rainbow Square in honour of LGBT and equal rights.

Copenhagen is home to one of Europe’s oldest gay bars, Centralhjørnet from 1917, which openly became a gay bar in 1950’s.

Free gay downloads

Download the Copenhagen Gay Guide 2016/17 or pick up a copy inside Copenhagen Visitor Centre. Please ask at the front desk for the map.

Download the free GAY CPH app

Download free Copenhagen Gay Guide app

Download Gay Agenda Copenhagen app

Most gay-friendly place on the planet

In 2014, Copenhagen was proclaimed the no. 1 most gay-friendly place on the planet by Lonely Planet, the largest travel guide book publisher in the world.

Earlier the same year, Copenhagen won the OUT Traveler "Where to Go Next/Breakout Destination" award.

Church of Our Lady, photo Copenhagen Media Center

Copenhagen most gay-friendly place on the planet

Copenhagen is the no. 1 most gay-friendly place on the planet according to Lonely Planet, the largest travel guide book publisher in the world.